Accessibility View Close toolbar
Menu

Call today:

Migraines

migraines_lightening.pngMany of those who suffer from migraines experience visual symptoms called an "aura" just prior to an attack that is often described as seeing flashing lights.

Migraine Headaches

Each year, about 25 million people in the U.S. experience migraine headaches, and about 75% are women. Migraines are intense and throbbing headaches that are often associated with nausea and sensitivity to light or noise. They can last from as little as a few hours to as long as a few days. Many of those who suffer from migraines experience visual symptoms called an "aura" just prior to an attack that is often described as seeing flashing lights or that everything takes on a dream-like appearance.

     Migraine sufferers usually have their first attack before age 30 and they tend to run in families, supporting the notion that there is a genetic component to them. Some people have attacks several times a month; others have less than one a year. Most people find that migraine attacks occur less frequently and become less severe as they get older.

Migraine headaches are caused by a constriction of the blood vessels in the brain, followed by a dilation of blood vessels. During the constriction of the blood vessels there is a decrease in blood flow, which is what leads to the visual symptoms that many people experience. Even in people who don't experience the classic migraine aura, most of them can tell that an attack is immanent. Once the blood vessels dilate, there is a rapid increase in blood pressure inside the head. It is this increased pressure that leads to the pounding headache. Each time the heart beats it sends another shock wave through the carotid arteries in the neck up into the brain.

     There are many theories about why the blood vessels constrict in the first place, but no one knows for sure. What we do know is that there are a number of things that can trigger migraines, such as lack of sleep, stress, flickering lights, strong odors, changing weather patterns and several foods; especially foods that are high in an amino acid called 'tyramine.' You can reduce the likelihood of migraine headaches by making some lifestyle changes.

Location

Find us on the map

Office Hours

Our Regular Schedule

ProNeuro Medical Group

Monday:

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tuesday:

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Wednesday:

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Thursday:

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Friday:

9:00 am - 4:00 pm

Saturday:

9:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Testimonials

  • "I was having headaches everyday due to concussions. My moods were unpredictable and I always felt like I was in a fog. I would have migraines at least once a week. I just didn't feel right and no one was able to tell me what was wrong. The neurologists I went to see would simply say I needed time to rest my brain after a concussion. They didn't tell me what part of my brain was affected or offer any form of treatment. I was frustrated and looking for anything to make me feel better. I went to Dr. Ruben as a last hope. Little did I know he was exactly what I needed. Dr. Ruben took his time to find out exactly what was wrong with me, bringing me not only piece of mind but also a solution. Today, I am feeling more like myself again. I haven't had a migraine in over two months and I can't remember the last time I had a headache. It was the first time in a long time that I felt like a doctor really cared. Thank you Dr. Ruben for giving me my life back!"
    Katie B. SMU Soccer
  • "I have been to other chiropractors, but none have provided the care or knowledge I received from Dr. St. Laurent. He was able to find the root causes to improve my brain chemistry. His understanding of neurology and adjusting techniques had me back on my feet in a few days with less visits."
    Liza L.